Hyundai provides healthcare to more than 10,000 people in Kenya

  • Through a partnership with Save the Children, Hyundai was able to provide healthcare to more than 10,000 people in rural Kenya
  • This was despite unexpected challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Hyundai began the partnership with the launch of the all-new i10 as part of its “Go Big” campaign
  • Save the Children is a charitable organisation that is active in 113 countries across the globe

- Through its partnership with Save the Children, the company was able to provide healthcare for more than 10,000 people in rural Kenya ( Madera County) over a six-month period.

In difficult times, Hyundai Motor Europe is supporting those who need it most.

The partnership with Save the Children, which Hyundai started as part of its “Go Big” campaign at the launch of the all-new i10, faced unexpected challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Nevertheless, both Hyundai and Save the Children were able to adapt their strategies to the current situation, and as a result, more than 10,000 people were able to receive medical treatment between 15 January and 31 July.

In addition to producing environmentally-friendly mobility solutions and democratising high-tech safety and connectivity technology, Hyundai also works with charitable organisations as part of its commitment to make the world a better place. This commitment is summarised in the company’s “Progress for Humanity” vision.

Partnering with charitable organisations such as Save the Children, demonstrates that Hyundai is committed to bring to life its brand vision and provide important support for humanity. For us, it’s not just about selling cars – we’re truly trying to make a positive impact in the world. You can see this in the motto of the all-new i10: Go Big. In this case, it means that nobody is too small to go big.

Andreas-Christoph HofmannVice President Marketing & Product at Hyundai Motor Europe

We actively engage in business partnerships in order to achieve most for children. Thanks to the generous support by Hyundai Motor Europe, we will be able to provide more than 21,000 children with lifesaving health services in Kenya.

Susanna KrügerCEO of Save the Children Germany

Protecting society’s most vulnerable: children in rural Kenya

In Kenya, one child in 30 dies before reaching its first birthday. Save the Children’s approach in rural Kenya involves training Community Health Workers (CHW) to treat children with preventable diseases. They also identify and refer children with disabilities to appropriate healthcare providers. Through healthcare interventions, expert referrals and community education, CHWs can contribute to a 60 to 90 per cent reduction in child deaths.

COVID-19 creates unexpected challenges

At the start of the project, Hyundai planned to donate one hour of healthcare worker service for every test drive undertaken with the all-new i10. However, as the COVID-19 pandemic made it impossible for test drives to take place for several months, Hyundai decided to donate a lump sum instead.

The donation made it possible for 3,116 children and 7,784 adults in rural Kenya to receive health care services over a six-month period. Of the children identified, 68 had disabilities. An additional 6,863 children and 5,636 adults also received indirect help from Save the Children through activities such as community health education and more.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the organisation adjusted its approach to ensure its services were compliant with current restrictions. These included equipping its health workers with masks and disinfectant and enforcing social distancing. Save the Children also took an active role in providing community health education on COVID-19 preventative measures. This was in addition to its regular work of helping children with disabilities and fighting preventable diseases. As a result, Save the Children was able to continue offering its lifesaving health interventions to the local communities in very remote areas of Kenya.

Josephine’s story

One of the beneficiaries of this important work was nine-year-old Josephine, who has cerebral palsy-hemiplegia. Two years ago, Josephine fell sick and had to be hospitalised for three weeks. She would need months of physiotherapy sessions to get well again, which her family couldn’t afford. Save the Children not only paid for her physiotherapy, they also gave her mother a transportation allowance so she could bring Josephine to her sessions. With the support of partners like Hyundai, Save the Children can continue to provide lifesaving healthcare services to children in need.


About Save the Children

Founded in 1919, Save the Children is the world’s largest independent children’s rights organisation and active in 113 countries across the globe. Protecting, empowering and supporting children is central to its mission. Its work focuses on education, protection from exploitation and violence, survival and health.